Ocean Conservancy is working with you to protect the ocean from today’s greatest challenges.
  • Share Your Gorgeous Ocean Snapshots
    Ocean Conservancy's 2022 #PhotoContest has finally arrived! 🎉 Could you be our next big ocean photography star? Submissions are open now through June 12.
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  • Will You Donate?
    Ocean Conservancy is tackling our ocean’s greatest global challenges, like climate change and plastic pollution. Will you donate today? Our ocean—and the animals and communities that rely on it—depend on your help.
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  • Volunteer Today
    Join a global movement to keep beaches, waterways and the ocean trash free. Head out to your favorite beach and use the app to easily record each item of trash you collect.
  • Turn Down the Volume
    Many ocean animals rely on sound to navigate, find prey, hide from predators and communicate with each other. But noise can make it harder for them to hear, which can affect their ability to survive. Unlike us, ocean animals can’t turn down the noise.
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The Latest
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2022 Photo Contest is Open for Submissions 📸

It’s the most wonderful time of the year … the annual Ocean Conservancy Photo Contest has …

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New Report Shows Fishery Management Floundering

Imagine this future: You go to the market to buy fish for dinner. What used to …

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The Slimy, Scaleless Snailfish

With one look at the snailfish, you can see where it gets its name. Its gelatinous, …

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Introducing the Global Ghost Gear Initiative Small Grants Recipients of 2022

Ocean Conservancy’s Global Ghost Gear Initiative® (GGGI) engages with international leadership as well as grassroots projects …

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Five Facts About Cold Water Corals

When you think of coral reefs, you most likely picture a tropical underwater landscape with clownfish …

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2022 Photo Contest is Open for Submissions 📸

It’s the most wonderful time of the year … the annual Ocean Conservancy Photo Contest has …

i
New Report Shows Fishery Management Floundering

Imagine this future: You go to the market to buy fish for dinner. What used to …

i
Introducing the Global Ghost Gear Initiative Small Grants Recipients of 2022

Ocean Conservancy’s Global Ghost Gear Initiative® (GGGI) engages with international leadership as well as grassroots projects …

i
Five Facts About Cold Water Corals

When you think of coral reefs, you most likely picture a tropical underwater landscape with clownfish …

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Green Sea Turtle
Chelonia mydas

Green sea turtles are unique—they are one of the largest species of turtle and the only turtle that is strictly herbivorous as an adult (although juvenile green sea turtles will also eat crabs, sponges and jellyfish). Green sea turtles eat sea grasses and algae, which results in the green-colored fat and cartilage that inspired their name. Like all sea turtles, green turtles have a protective shell but can’t pull their head and flippers inside like land turtles can.

Green sea turtles nest on the same beach where they hatched. Since they don’t reach sexual maturity until at least 20 years old, this is even more impressive. So, how do they find their way home more than 20 years later? Green sea turtles actually use the Earth’s magnetic forces to navigate their way home. At night, they crawl onto the beach and lay somewhere between 85-200 eggs under the sand. After two months, the juvenile sea turtles will emerge to dodge predators like birds and crabs in a mad dash to the ocean.

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